Baby names with the cutest nicknames

Nicknames are even more important than many people realize. No pressure or anything, but your kid's nickname may seriously impact their life. Did you know that people who go by shorter names tend to earn more money and may ultimately be more successful? 

So we've established that nicknames are important, but, unfortunately, not all baby names are created equal when it comes to truncation. While there are some traditional ways of deriving nicknames, such as taking part of the name and ending it in "y" or "ie," the formula doesn't always work smoothly. Unless you love a short name to begin with, it's worth taking a look at these gorgeous baby names, which also pair with nicknames we know you'll love just as much.


Amelia is one of the most popular names in the world, ranking high on charts of baby names in the United States, Canada, Australia, Europe, and even Chile. Amelia is a variant of the Greek name Amalia, which, in turn, comes from the Germanic Amala. There are vast array of possible nicknames for this name. 

Possible diminutives of this charming moniker include Amy, Mel, Lia, and Millie.


Francisco is the Spanish and Portuguese version of the name Francis, so it should be no surprise that the name is most popular in Portugal and Spanish-speaking countries, although it is starting to gain some traction in the United States. Some of its best nicknames come from variations in other languages. 

There are the English names Frank or Frankie, the Italian Franco, and the multinational Frans, which is used in Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland, and the Netherlands.


Evelyn comes from an English last name that was ultimately derived from the Germanic name Avelina. While it has primarily been used as a masculine name for most of its history, in modern times it is mostly considered feminine due to its association with the feminine name Evelina

While you could still use Evelyn as a name for a little boy, its nicknames, Evie, Eve, and Lyn, work better for girls.


Christopher is one of those enduringly popular names that seems to be used in every generation. Widely used since the 15th century, it's popular in many English-speaking countries, as well as other parts of the globe. With so many people bearing the name, it's a good thing that it comes with some great nickname options. 

Sure, you could go with the obvious abbreviation of the name, Chris, or you could go for a less common nickname such as Christoph, Topher, or Kit. For a truly unique and rarely-used nickname, take a look at Kester.


The name Penelope has been around since ancient times. A figure in Greek mythology, Penelope is remembered as the wife of the hero Odysseus, and is memorialized in Homer's Odyssey. Penelope has some pretty adorable nicknames that can be derived from it. 

There's Penny, which could also be shortened to Pen, and Nelly, which can similarly be shortened to Nel or Nell.


Kenneth is an English version of two Gaelic names. The first, Cináed means "born of fire." The other name is Coinneach which comes from the Gaelic word  "caoin," meaning "handsome." If you don't speak Gaelic, Kenneth will doubtlessly be easier for you to not only say, but to come up with a nickname for. 

The easiest nicknames for Kenneth are Ken and Kenny, but you could also go for the less obvious nickname of Kent.


Gabriella is the feminine form of the Hebrew name Gabriel. Like its male counterpart, Gabriella is used internationally. It is also one of the most popular names for babies in the United States. While it is only two letters off from Gabriel, those two letters make a big difference when it comes to nicknames, making nicknames like Ella and Briella possible. 

Other lovely nicknames include Gabby, Brielle, and Bri.


A popular name since ancient times when it was widely used in Greece, it's easy to think of this name as old fashioned, but Theodore is still in the top 100 names for baby boys in the United States. It's also a top ranked name in Canada, Australia, England, and Wales. 

If you like the sound of this stately name, but still can't shake off the feeling that it's outdated, try a more modern sounding nickname like Ted, Teddy, or Theo.  


The name Melinda debuted in the 18th century as a combination of Mel, which is a common element found in many other names like Melissa, Melody, and Melanie, and the suffix "inda." One theory about its origin is that it could have been inspired by the nearly identical name Belinda. There are so many ways to customize this pretty name for your little girl. 

Some of the choices include Mel, Melly, Linda, Lindy, and Mindy.


A feminine form of the name Nicholas, meaning "victory of the people," Nicole only started gaining traction in the U.S. in the mid-20th century. Some of its nicknames are fairly straightforward, like Nicki or Nico, but you could also get creative and try variations of the name that come from other languages. 

The Slovene variation of the name, Nika, makes for a gorgeous nickname, as do the French nicknames Colette and Coline.


Jameson was originally a last name meaning "son of James," but is now also a dignified-sounding first name. It's a good alternative to the much more frequently used name of James (which can also be used as a nickname for Jameson). While the name is a distinguished and powerful one, it can be a bit formal, especially for a baby, so shorter and cuter nicknames are a must! Luckily, this name offers no short supply of options. 

Potential nicknames for Jameson include Jamie, Jim, Jimmy, and Jay.


Technically, the name Gianna is already a nickname. It's the shortened form of the name Giovanna, which is the Italian form of Johanna. This name has a long and slightly complicated history, having morphed over time through different cultures and languages, but can ultimately be traced back to the ancient Hebrew name Yehochanan. This biblical name is actually the origin of many names that are commonly used today, including John, Jean, Shauna, and Evan

Nicknames for Gianna are short and sweet, and include Gia, Gigi, and Anna.  


This Latin name was traditionally given to boys who were born on a Sunday, but we'll look the other way if your baby Dominic is born on another day! The name has a long history behind it, having been used in England since the 13th century. It's still quite popular in English-speaking countries, falling just out of the top 100 male baby names in England, but making the chart in the United States, Canada, and Australia. 

Good nickname choices for the name Dominic include Dom, Dommie, Nick, and Nico.