Things you should consider before moving in with your significant other

There comes a time in every relationship when a couple starts getting serious and begins to wonder if they should move in together. There are a lot of pros to cohabiting with your significant other. You get to be around your beloved every day, save money on rent, and have someone to split housework with.

Of course, moving in together also adds a lot of pressure to a relationship. Living together means people will start asking when you plan on getting married. You'll also have to deal with any habits your partner may have that are simply annoying while living apart but suddenly become unbearable when you're constantly next to your sweetheart. When is a good time to move in with your significant other?

You and your significant other need to have the money talk before moving in together

Moving in with your significant other is a big step, and there are some things you should think about before you make the leap. It's not enough to simply enjoy spending time together. You want to make sure that you're on the same page about certain things. According to Forbes, it's a good idea for couples to discuss your finances before moving in together.

This includes knowing how much debt the other person has, how much they earn, and also deciding how you will split bills in your household. You should also decide what will happen in the event of a breakup. Breakups are bad enough without fighting over who will keep the TV and who will get the sofa. Forbes recommends drafting a cohabitation agreement that provides you with legal protection in the event of a death or a breakup.

Examine your relationship before moving in with your significant other

Money aside, you also need to examine how well you work together as a couple. Moving.com recommends evaluating your relationship. While you don't have to plan to get hitched in order to move in together, you should ideally move in with a partner you can see yourself with long term. If you're in a one-sided relationship or there are signs that your relationship is abusive, you should not only not live together but you should also think about breaking up.

You should also examine how you handle conflict. If you and your significant other are constantly butting heads, moving in together might not be such a good idea, at least not until you learn how to communicate better. You should also keep in mind that your significant other's friends will likely spend a lot of time at your shared space, so if you can't stand any of their pals, you might want to reconsider signing that lease.